Stream These 11 Movies Before They Leave Netflix in February


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Oscar Isaac is in fine form as a tough but sensitive Nazi hunter tasked with finding and extracting Adolf Eichmann (Ben Kingsley), one of the architects of the Final Solution, from his hide-out in Argentina to stand trial in Jerusalem. This true story is efficiently dramatized by the director Chris Weitz (whose filmography, which includes such divergent efforts as “American Pie” and “About A Boy,” might not make him an obvious choice for a tough historical drama), and though Matthew Orton’s screenplay includes juicy supporting roles for the likes of Nick Kroll, Mélanie Laurent and Haley Lu Richardson, its best scenes put Isaac and Kingsley toe to toe and watch them work.

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This German crime epic became an international sensation when it began airing in 2017 — reportedly the most expensive television program ever produced in its home country. Based on the best-selling novels by Volker Kutscher and brought to life by a trio of writer-directors (Achim von Borries, Henk Handloegten and Tom Tykwer, the latter of “Run Lola Run” and “Cloud Atlas”), this sprawling, handsomely mounted narrative is set in the underworld of Germany during the Weimar Republic, the wild and fruitful period that preceded the Third Reich. It’s dizzyingly complex and giddily entertaining, but also timely; as Handloegten noted on its premiere: “All these people didn’t fall from the sky as Nazis. They had to become Nazis.”

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Before it was a turbulent television series, and before its director made Oscar history for his “Parasite” sweep at the 2020 Oscars, the graphic novel “Le Transperceneige” by Jacques Lob, Benjamin Legrand and Jean-Marc Rochette was adapted into this thrilling yet thought-provoking 2014 action epic. Bong Joon Ho directs and co-writes with his signature blend of compelling action and social commentary, telling the postapocalyptic tale of a world frozen over, its sole inhabitants passengers on a train that makes no stops — and one where, in spite of their chaotic circumstances, strict separation of the classes is still in place. Chris Evans, Captain America himself, stars as the leader of the underclass, who foments a revolution that results in disturbing revelations about those around them. Jamie Bell, Ed Harris, John Hurt, Alison Pill, Octavia Spencer, Tilda Swinton and the “Parasite” star Song Kang-ho round out the cast.

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You can set your clock by it: a sure-to-be blockbuster sequel is heading into theaters, so its distributor will pull the predecessor from the subscription streamers to get that sweet à la carte rental cash. With “Dune: Part Two” hitting theaters on March 1, “Dune: Part One” (not its official title, but its accurate one) leaves Netflix the day before, so catch up before it’s too late. Denis Villeneuve directs, with an appropriate combination of solemnity and spectacle; Timothée Chalamet, Rebecca Ferguson, Oscar Isaac, Jason Momoa and Zendaya star.

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For decades now, filmmakers have given us countless tales of high school kids on the sexual precipice — horny teens obsessed with “losing it,” from “Porky’s” to “American Pie” to “Superbad.” The writers of “Superbad,” Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg, are among the producers of this 2019 comedy, which ups the stakes a bit by focusing on a trio of 12-year-old boys. Sensitive viewers may cringe at the notion of pubescents engaging in a one-crazy-night adventure that grazes sex, drugs and criminal activity, but those who are willing to go with it (and who remember that age themselves) will find much to chuckle at here. The direction by Gene Stupnitsky is energetic, and the kids at the center — Keith L. Williams, Brady Noon and the “Room” star Jacob Tremblay — are ceaselessly charming.

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